The 2020 Historic Preservation Awards

Each year thousands of South Carolinians work to preserve the state’s legacy that is reflected in our historic buildings, structures, and sites. Since 1995, the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Preservation South Carolina, and the Office of the Governor have recognized exceptional accomplishments in the preservation, rehabilitation, and interpretation of our architectural and cultural heritage with a series of statewide awards.

These efforts demonstrate the outstanding commitment to preserving South Carolina’s history; therefore the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Preservation South Carolina, and the Office of the Governor have joined together to announce the 26th Annual South Carolina Historic Preservation Awards, recognizing exemplary work in historic preservation in South Carolina.

The selection panel that chooses the awards from the list of those submitted are:

  • A representative from the Office of the Governor
  • Preservation South Carolina Board President (or designee)
  • The Director of the SC Department of Archives and History (or designee)
  • A representative from the board of the Preservation South Carolina
  • Two representatives from the SC Department of Archives and History
  • A representative of Preservation South Carolina’s 5 for the Future Membership
  • A representative from the SC African American Heritage Commission
  • A representative from the Confederation of SC Local Historical Societies
  • A representative from the National Trust for Historic Preservation
  • A representative from the SC Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism

Now… Presentation of Awards

Preservation Service Award:
Dorchester Heritage Center

Phyllis Hughes
Dorchester Heritage Center
for
Dorchester Heritage Center

The Dorchester Heritage Center has made exemplary contributions  to the advancement of historic preservation. Their commitment to preservation and innovative preservation practices exemplifies preservation service and is worthy of recognition. The DHC was created from the Dorchester County Historical Society, which was established in 2004. Theprimary mission of the Historical Society was the preservation of the Koger Murray Carroll House on Old Wire Road.

From this initial challenge, a much greater mission was born. They created a subsidiary called the Dorchester County Archives and History Center that is dedicated to the collecting and providing access to the papers and artifacts important in Dorchester County's history and culture.

Finding a home for the Center was an early obstacle. They overcame this with the help of Dorchester County Council who made part of the former County Courthouse in St. George available in May 2014. For the next three years, volunteers worked tirelessly to transform the space that held County land records, clerk of court, treasurer, auditor, and probate judge into the archives and museum.

During this time, the Center accessioned 192,000 documents and objects and prepared exhibits for the new museum. The new space opened to the public in January 2017 with a traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution called "The Way We Worked". This was the debut for the exhibit and stands as a testament to the professionalism with which the Center has approached their mission.

The impact on the community was immediate. Every fifth-grade student in Dorchester County, and some from Colleton County visited the Center in the early months of 2017. Many more visitors, both adults and children, came to see the exhibit and to learn about the Center and the important role that they play in preserving and exploring the region's history.

The Center has continued to amass papers and objects from Dorchester County, northern Colleton County, southern Orangeburg County, and western Berkeley County. The success of the archives and museum, has created new obstacles, including the need to raise capital and the need for additional space. To face these obstacles, a new not-for-profit corporation was created and on August 30, 2019 became the Dorchester Heritage Center, Inc.

The mission of the DHC is, "To preserve the county's heritage for future generations through innovative leadershipeducation, and programs by redefining the effort of preservation as a future-oriented, proactive set of behaviors engineered tointelligently and continually weave or values, stories, lands, and culture into the fabric of future growth." The DHC fulfills the forward-looking mission of carrying today's sense of community into the future by organizing and conducting their activities into five objectives : Archives, Educational Programs, Collaborative Initiatives, Genealogy, and the Museum.

 


Preservation Service Award:
Baxter-Patrick James Island Library

Janet Alexander
Charleston County Public Library
for
Baxter-Patrick James Island  Library

The Evergreen (Grimball) Cemetery is located behind the new Baxter-Patrick County Library on James Island. The Librarywas completed in November 2019. The cemetery, previously known as Grimball Cemetery, dates to as early as 1906. During the 1960s, the name changed to Evergreen and was an active cemetery until April 2003.

The Baxter-Patrick Cemetery Project can trace its roots back to another James Island cemetery project. Charlotte Smith and Lish Thompson, members of the CCPL staff working in the South Carolina Room, documented the 63 burials ofMcLeod Plantation Cemetery in Fall 2016 for their cultural history interpreter, Shawn Halifax. That project initially began with the library's program in June 2016 about the Charleston County Parks and Recreation's extensive renovation of the McLeod Plantation's house and grounds. The project completed in December 2016 and in January 2017, Thompson learned that there was an undocumented cemetery on the new James Island Library site, which was the old Baxter-Patrick School site. This became the basis for the Baxter-Patrick Cemetery Project.

The main objective of this project was to fully document the individuals buried in the Evergreen Cemetery. Charlotte Smith and Lish Thompson, members of the CCPL staff, working in the South Carolina Room at the main branch of thelibrary, researched death and funeral notices in the Charleston Evening Post, News and Courier, and the Post and Courier. They also searched for death certificates and Social Security Death Index information from Ancestry.com. They took picturesand gathered information on each marked burial site, visiting the cemetery thirteen times over a five-and-a -half-month period. They took more than 850 photographs, transcribed marker inscriptions, and identified 261 marked burials. They indexed Eugene Frasier's two books, James Island Stories from Slave Descendants and A History of James Island Descendants and Plantation Owners to help identify potential burials in the cemetery. During their research, Smith and Thompson found an additional 51 unmarked burials and 32 potential burials.

CCPL compiled this information into a database with the hope of expanding family relationships and connections toother Evergreen burials. They put the photos and documents into five large binders kept at the new Baxter-Patrick Library forthe public to use for research. Charlotte Smith entered this information into a comprehensive database. The database includes marker inscriptions, statistics for the cemetery, and information about each person buried in the cemetery.

Prior to construction for the library, archaeologist Gwendolyn Moore of the local firm of Brockington and Associates conducted a Ground Penetrating Radar survey on a portion of the library property directly adjacent to thecemetery to ensure no unmarked graves would be affected by construction. Over 50 possible unmarked graves were identified. The county subsequently expanded the boundaries of the cemetery and erected a decorative fence around the burialground.

In 2018, the county, with the help of Carol Poplin and Rachel Bragg ofHW Exhibits, began planning for a multi-component interpretive program about the history of the cemetery, the Grimball community, and James Island in general. The plans included an indoor interpretive timeline, outdoor interpretive panels set along a landscaped path that connects the library to the cemetery, and two interpretive waysides in a small sitting area near the cemetery. In addition, a local artist wascommissioned to create a unique sculpture that was installed along the history path. The exhibits opened to the public in November 2019.

The impact of the Baxter-Patrick Cemetery Project on James Island and the Grimball community is tremendous. The juxtaposition of the cemetery, library and school stand as a clear reminder that our future lies with our past and that historic preservation plays a vital role in a strong community of life-long learners. This project was not easy. African American history is particularly challenging. It required months of hard work, determination, and cooperation from numerous people form a variety of places and organizations. The preservation techniques, including genealogical research, oral history, state ofthe art remote sensing, interpretive planning, and public access, were exemplary.

 


 

Preservation Service Award:
Summerton Community Action Group

Summerton Community Action Group
for
Summerton Community Action Group

Separate Is Not Equal

South Carolina is the home of the pivotal Briggs vs. Elliott school desegregation case that helped form the basis of the nation' s landmark Brown vs. Board of Education lawsuit. On May 28, 1951, Thurgood Marshall, Robert Carter, and Spottswood Robinson of the NAACP brought the case before a three-judge panel at the federal courthouse in Charleston, South Carolina.The defendant was Roderick W. Elliott, a local sawmill owner and the school board chairman.

Building upon the research findings of Dr. Kenneth Clark, the lawyers argued that segregated schools harmed black children psychologically and violated the Fourteenth Amendment's guarantee of equal protection under the law. Two of the judges,citing the Plessy v.

Ferguson decision of 1896, held that separate-but-equal facilities were constitutional and ruled against the parents. The families appealed, and the case reached the U.S. Supreme Court with similar cases from around the country.

Today, most people know of Brown vs. Board of Education but are not aware of the impact that Briggs vs. Elliott had on school desegregation in South Carolina and across the nation. The Summerton Community Action Group, as well as the town of Summerton, felt the need to

  • highlight this important case. They felt that there had been no recognition of this community, where the case started, and that if done properly it would raise the profile of the community and the

The Summerton Community Action Group came to the South Carolina African American Heritage Foundation for guidance and assistance. Based on the success of the Green Book of South Carolina www.greenbookofsc.com, the recommendation was to create a brochure guiding visitors on a tour of sites in South Carolina related to the people and events of the case. Armed with ideas, determination and a desire to create something significant but with no money, the group begin working with Dawn Dawson-House, ex-officio member of the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission and director of corporate communications at South Carolina Parks, Recreation and Tourism, to develop a comprehensive and informative brochure chronicling important sites associated with the landmark case. Ms. Dawson-House solicited the cooperation of historians on the S.C. African American Heritage Commission to vet sites suggested and write the script for the brochure. The group then went to work to secure funding. Eventually funding was received from the town of Summerton, Columbia SC 63 and the South Carolina African American Heritage Foundation.

Completed in January of 2019, the project was launched to the community and state by Congressman James E. Clyburn in February of 2019.

This project goes a long way to preserve the legacy of those families involved in the Briggs vs. Elliott case, South Carolina's impact on school integration in the country, and the critical role Summerton played in national history. The community can now use this project and the guided tour to educate students and visitors about the people, sites, and institutions that contributed to a watershed moment in our collective histories.

 


Preservation Service Award:
Sally Reahard Visitor Center at Drayton Hall

Carter Hudgins
Drayton Hall Preservation Trust
for
Sally Reahard Visitor Center at Drayton Hall

The Sally Reahard Visitors Center at Drayton Hall is a new construction project on the historic site of Drayton Hall, a National Historic Landmark and the oldest preserved plantation house in America open to the public. The estate, founded in 1738, is an exquisite example of Palladian architecture in North America and is located on the Ashley River surrounded by ancient live oak trees. Located about 15 miles from Charleston, the estate is a popular tourist destination with opportunities for guests to tour the house, exhibits, and grounds throughout the week. In addition to the main plantation house, the site also features an African American cemetery, a garden, and a caretaker's house - which was carefully relocated and rehabilitated during construction. The new Visitors Center now provides a central gathering location for those visiting the historic estate for a tour or reception, as well as serving as a home for important artifacts from the proper ty.

The Visitors Center itself, designed by Glenn Keyes Architects and built by Hood Construction, totals 6,000 SF and encompasses about four acres of the expansive 125 acre estate. Because of the highly sensitive nature of this historic property which remained open to tourists throughout the course of construction, the Hood team worked closely with the owner to develop a minimally-disruptive logistics plan that allowed tours to continue as scheduled. Close coordination with the Board of Architectural Review was also required.

Those visiting the grounds approach the Visitors Center via a beautiful brickwork walkway surrounded by monumental live oaks and lush landscaping featuring native plants. The two wings of the facility are con nected by a breezeway which allows the coastal breezes from the Ashley River- a hallmark of visiting the Lowcountry - to pass through. A central breezeway also connects the two sections of the Education Center, which boasts exposed wood ceilings, which take design inspiration from the timber-framed roof structure of the main house. In addition, the Education Center boasts a slate floor, large windows and doors with transoms, and fireplaces.

Visitors are also free to peruse the museum-grade exhibition space which houses Drayton Hall Preservation Trust's collections - which rotate between Drayton family decorative arts objects, archaeological artifacts, archival materials, and architectural fragments. All lighting, mechanical units, and cabinetry in this area meet the museum-grade standard. Until the Visitors Center was constructed, these items had never before been on public display.

An orientation hall with large format projection screen provides an area for further education on the history of the Home. Presently, a piece entitled, "Port to Plantation: Slavery and the Making of the Early Lowcountry Economy" is presented by historical interpreters, with images of documents, artifacts, and maps that illuminate the multifaceted nature of slavery at Drayton Hall in the l8th and 19th centuries.

A gift shop with custom cabinetry and millwork is also available to guests who wish to purchase anything from high-end art reproductions to pieces inspired by the Drayton Family's extensive porcelain collection, to local food favorites.

The Sally Reahard Visitors Center is an exemplary candidate for the South Carolina Historic Preservation Awards' Heritage Tourism Award, because it tr uly promotes one South Carolina's finest cultural resources, as well as one of the most historically significant homes in North America. Thousands of tourists visit the estate each year, and their experience now is more complete than ever before with the addition of the Visitors Center and its orientation hall and exhibition space. The addition of the education hall and meeting room also allows for more flexibility for future event rentals at the property, which benefits the estate as a whole and also allows for the celebration and appreciation of this important historic site by even more visitors each year.

 


Stewardship Award:
Holly Spring School

Holly Springs Baptist Church
for
Holly Spring School

The Holly Spring School is located in southern Greenville County in a community called Possum Kingdom. The exact construction date of the school in not documented but oral history places it in the 1870's. The school was created for the children of former slaves in the area and there is a distinct possibility that the building is actually a former double pen slave cabin that was modified into a school based on its physical characteristics and construction techniques. In 1891the preexisting school wasformally sold to a board of trustees made up of local community leaders. It then continued to serve as a schoo l for AfricanAmerica n students though out the first half of the twentieth century. It was eventually incorporated into the Greenville CountySchool System and was fi nally closed upon integration of the school district. Since that time the building has sat vacant on the grounds of theHolly Spring Baptist Church, an African American Baptist Church established adjacent to the school in the early twentieth century. The school has been owned and maintained by the church for the last 60 years as donations from the community and volunteers would allow. As with many small rural churches the congregation has aged and shrunk considerably resulting differed maintenance that could have eventually resulted in the buildings demise.

In the spring of 2018 Reverend Massey, the Pastor of Holly Spring Baptist Church, approached the Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission about the state of the school and requested assistance in finding a way to save the building. The GCHPS under the leadership of then Chairwoman Anne Peden, in conjunction with Reverend Massey, reached out to Kyle Campbe ll with Preservation South, a local preservation consulting firm, to develop a pro bono plan for addressing the building's needs. With no budget to speak of the church organized a gospel singing in the community to raise funds and the Fork Shoals Historical Society provided a thousand dollars in matching grant funds to get things moving. Ultimately a total of four thousand dollars were raised locally from many small donors giving whatever they could. This was not enough to address all of the building's needs, so the preservation consultant set about reaching out to local businesses for support . A number of local companies pro videdvirtually all the materials for the project at no cost, including the new roof from Best Buy Metals, the paint from SherwinWilliams, the window glass from LEB Glass. Greenville County Parks and Rec. also allowed the project to use extra wood sidingfrom another restoration project in the county.

With the materials secured, and funds to cover installation in place, work began in the late summ er of 2018. The entire front sillof the building was rotten and in need of replacement. The building was also severely wracked and was leaningtoward the rear putting it in danger of collapse. Carpenter Riley Brazil in st alled a new sill, and the building was manually pushed upr ight, and new bracing was added to the int erior to keep it standing. Siding was replaced and the door openingsrestored with doors found at a salvage yard four hours away. The window sashes were in place and were removed and re-glazed in Mr. Campbell's living room. The building was then repainted in it s historic color scheme. A former student, now in their eighties,produced a photo of the building in the late 1930's that indicated the building originally had a contrasting color scheme. Based on that in fo an in-depth analysis of the building was completed to locate the original colors which turned out to be forest green and cream. The historic photo also informed the somewhat int eresting placement of the colors and also informed the color of the new standing seam metal roof. All this work allowed the building to be restored to its original appearance when it was a school.

If this project had not been undertaken the building would have surely been lost to the community. This project is a primeexample of what can happen when a community comes together to save a historic resource, and it wou ldn't have happened without the team that was created. Now Holly Spring Schoo l will survive well into the future and can be interpreted as a rare example of an early African American school building in our state.

 


Stewardship Award:
Clemson University

Steve Stovall
Clemson University

for
Clemson University

As with most large public institutions Clemson University has not always been known for its proactive preservation efforts. Whilemuch of the campus has retained its historic architectural resources and has been nominated to the National Register, sites like FortHill have received large scale restoration efforts but the majority of campus buildings are maintained with a focus on academic usemaking preservation concerns secondary. This had resulted in the campus losing some of its historic integrity and becoming very homogeneous. In 2015 the University undertook the exterior restoration of Holtzendorff Hall, built in 1915 it is the first of Rudolf Lee's Italian Renaissance buildings on campus. Holtzendorff had received multiple unsympathetic renovations over the years including the removal of many of the large wood casement windows on the front fai;ade of the building and replacing them with single sheets of glass in aluminum frames. This sort of wholesale removal of details and replacement with low maintenance materials regardless of design had been the rule not the exception up until this project. The replacement of the remaining original windows was ruled out and the decision was made to refurbish them. The previously replaced windows were removed and new wood replacements were installed that match the original plans for the building. In the course of the refurbishment the original two t one color scheme was found in documentary photos and on the building, the decision was made to repaint the building in its original color scheme despite the fact that the entire campus had been painted snow white for decades.

The rehabilitation of Holtzendorff Hall was well received by students and alumni alike and led the University to begin toreconsider their cyclical maintenance priorities in the future. The following year in 2016 the rehabilit ation of the 1940 Art DecoOutdoor Theatre had begun. The t heatre, with its stucco exterior and deco details, had also been painted white for decades and many ofits design details were easily overlooked. As the stabilization and restuccoing of the structure took place a color scheme was createdbased on hist oric images and archival documentation. These varying shades of taupe carried from the stone paving highlight the retailsof the outdoor theatre and returned the Deco character to the structure.

In 2018 the University doubled its efforts and restored the exteriors of two historic academic buildings. Hardin Hall was begun in1895 and is one of the oldest buildings on campus. Gutted by fire in the 19S0' s the building's hipped roof was recreated sixty years later but the exterior still looked lost. Much of the buildings late Victorian details had been lost to repeated slathering's of white paint. The pressed tin trim, which was designed to emulate the natural stone found elsewhere and the building, was repain ted in a t wo-tone scheme that mimicked the stonework and highlight all of the building's detail based on historic images of the building. Riggs Hall was built in 1928 and is another of Lee's five Italian Renaissance buildings on campus. Built as the architecture building, the department founded by Lee, it is the most high style of any of his buildings. Historic images indicated that the building's trim contrasted significantly with the brick and limestone fai;ade. Paint analysis revealed that the original trim was two tones of green to emulate bronze. This was an unexpected finding that caused a lot of discussion on campus but the university ultimately made the decision to restore the authenticity of the Lee's original design intent and painted it in the original scheme. It took a few weeks for the buildings occupants to get used to the scheme but ultimately it has been embraced by the campus.

All of these projects highlighted the campuses architectural integrity in a much more authentic way. Students and visitors alike now notice the different architectural styles on campus and feedback from visitors has beenvery positive. The university plans to continue this process of restoring missing details and recreating historic the original design intents as more historic buildings come up for repainting and exterior maintenance in the future. We hope that this effort on a campus the size of Clemson's can serve as an inspiration for other institutions around the state to rethink their maintenance program and endeavor to restore their architectural integrity asfunding and opportunity become available.

 


Stewardship Award:
Hampton-Preston Mansion & Gardens

Historic Columbia
for
Hampton-Preston Mansion & Gardens

As the contractual steward of the circa-1818 Hampton-Preston Mansion & Gardens, Historic Columbia recognized the potential that commemorating the 200th anniversary of this National Register-listed, local landmark could have on advancing the interpretation of African American history in the state capital and catalyzing private and public support for historic preservation endeavors. Subsequently, Historic Columbia embarked on “Hampton-Preston 200,” a multi- faceted initiative to address both areas while heightening public awareness of both the process behind the work and the final products of the months-long effort. The result in May of 2018 marked both the attainment of these two goals and the initiation of further capital improvements made possible through continued support from two key private donors. Today, the over-200- year-old property serves as a gateway into a more holistic understanding of Columbia’s, Richland County’s and South Carolina’s 19th through mid-20th century past through enhanced interpretive platforms, new period displays, rehabilitated gardens, classrooms and further public amenities including bathrooms and event and programmatic spaces.

Preservation Techniques/ Degree of Difficulty

During the course of this initiative Historic Columbia employed unprecedented research in developing a frank interpretation of the African American experience during enslavement and throughout the Reconstruction through Jim Crow eras. Previously unknown primary resources, culled from repositories in four states and the National Archives and Library of Congress, established new perspectives on juxtaposing the lives enslaved men, women, and children had to those of their white enslavers. Further materials, including antebellum and later-19th and early 20th-century images placed a human face on persons historically excluded from traditional historic site interpretation. Hand in glove with these discoveries Historic Columbia staff and volunteers participated in continuing education programs aimed at heightening awareness of and skills for interpreting race, power, class, and gender. These skills, coupled with tablet-enhanced guided tours, upgraded period rooms, and 22 wayside signs located throughout the four-acre property’s newly revitalized gardens, propelled the organization further down the path toward more inclusive and representative historical interpretation—a journey begun in earnest at the completely re-invented Woodrow Wilson Family Home and Museum of Reconstruction, which was debuted in 2014.

While addressing moisture issues plaguing the two-century-old structure’s basement and 1970- era stucco, Historic Columbia embraced the opportunity to more accurately reflect the structure’s post-1850 aesthetic for which the Prestons’ tenancy was historically known. This exterior modification followed scientific analysis of small fragments of historic mortar found during excavation for waterproofing the foundation and samples from the remaining historic aspects of the front perimeter wall, culled during a previous rehabilitation of that feature. The prospect to act upon research findings made by Dr. William “Bill” Seale during his tenure at Historic Columbia between 1969-1971 proved tempting enough to a private donor who funded both the replication of an ashlar, or cut-stone aesthetic arrived at by texture painting the plaster walls, and the creation and installation of a period-appropriate painted oil cloth suitable for interpreting the building’s earliest years under its original owners, Ainsley and Sarah Hall. The result totally transformed the building’s formal entry, which for decades had inaccurately reflected the economic wherewithal of its owners, whose wealth stemmed from the enslavement of people of color. Collectively, the historically accurate exterior paint colors and interior has surprised many patrons for its boldness, which has created a visual “hook” with which Historic Columbia has been able to challenge visitors’ preconceived notions of historically accurate portrayals of the past—both aesthetically and culturally.

With the interpretation of the African American experience designed to far surpass “Home to Many People,” an initial exhibit opened in 2002 within the building’s basement, this area of the building was slated for adaptive use through a comprehensive renovation. Reconditioning of the basement required extensive construction in order to render the historic structure viable for code compliance and public use. Improvements included adding new heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment and duct work; replacing an non-historic brick floor for installation of a poured concrete floor; installing new electrical wiring and lighting throughout six newly created rooms (two classrooms, the center hallway, a special events room and two public rest rooms); adding new plumbing; installing cabinetry; repainting all wood surfaces; and bisecting the hallway with a glass partition wall for security. This work, made possible through a generous donation from the Boyd Foundation, prompted further private funding through the Graham Foundation, which underwrote the purchase of classroom furnishings and a SmartBoard.

Further property improvements associated with the mansion involved the installation of a sunken interpretive and programmatic space contiguous to the structure’s north elevation that exactly mimicked the location of the Prestons’ mid-19th-century addition, which was unfortunately removed in 1969. Considerable archaeological work, which revealed previously unknown features, preceded this work and informed interpretation of this antebellum aspect of the estate. When completed, this unique feature incorporated modern-day amenities including lighting, electrical outlets, tent pole receptacles, custom wrought ironwork, and garden beds to allow Historic Columbia to harness the site’s rental income potential, thus empowering the organization’s preservation efforts through self-sufficiency. Beyond the building’s footprint, two acres of gardens were established with native plants and trees, which bolstered the property’s curated horticultural collection, and were further improved through benches, pathway lighting, and garbage receptacles funded through a grant from the Central Carolina Community Foundation.

Despite the highly involved construction management, the extensive research and reinterpretation efforts, and the dramatic shift in conducting tours at the site, there is no issue that stands out as a major challenge. Perhaps that challenge will present itself later, as staff looks toward further future improvements at the Richland County-owned historic site.

Community Impact

Thanks to the success of the interpretative and capital improvements at the Hampton-Preston Mansion & Gardens between 2018 and 2020, Historic Columbia Foundation has positioned itself to more effectively meet its mission “to nurture, support, and protect the historical and cultural heritage of Columbia and Richland County through programs of advocacy, education, and preservation.” Fueled by the success enjoyed thus far, a future capital project—the construction of a building featuring a working greenhouse, programmatic space, and horticultural staff offices. Historic Columbia anticipates that the interpretive and capital improvement initiative will continue to yield considerable fruit as it further reveals the institution’s posture and establishes its reputation as a progressive educational institution committed to improving the community’s quality of life, increasing local heritage tourism, and offering diversified educational and interpretive products.

 


Heritage Tourism Award:
Columbia SC 63: Our Story Matters

Columbia SC 63: Our Story Matters
for
Columbia SC 63: Our Story Matters

In the eight years since its inception, Columbia SC 63 has helped to grow the public understanding of Columbia, South Carolina's rich civil rights history, utilizing historic buildings and sites to make the city's vibrant history come to life. Through research, tours, and public events, Columbia SC 63 has drawn attention to the little-known civil right's history hidden in plainsight. Created by Major Steve Benjamin in partnership with six other southern cities, from the very beginning Columbia SC 63 worked to create a broadly accessible appreciation of Columbia's historic resources.

Columbia SC 63's work has enhanced the public's access to historical knowledge across the city. In 2013, Columbia SC 63 sponsored the creation of wayside signs along Main Street in Columbia and at other historic sites. During the 1950s and 1960s,downtown Columbia served as the site of major civil rights activism, from lawsuits and organizing meetings to mass protests and sit-in demonstrations. These signs allow visitors to Columbia a free walking tour of the city's civil rights history, bringing attention to historic properties along one of Columbia's busiest streets. Moreover, they reframe the stories of the city's historic sites and buildings, adding an additional layer of history to these locations. Since then, Columbia SC 63 has continued to add to the historical narrative around the city by sponsoring the erection of historical markers at the sites of sit-ins. Outside of the former Eckerd Drug Store and Taylor Street Pharmacy, Columbia SC 63 has helped to make the history of these sites accessible to the broader public.

With these markers around downtown, Columbia SC 63 has given hundreds of tours to groups large and small. These walking tours provide members of the public with a new way of seeing Columbia's Main Street. Tours typically start on the grounds of the statehouse, where Columbia SC 63 presents the center of legislation in South Carolina as a historic site associated with the demonstrations of the civil rights movement. Moving down Main Street, a number of historic buildings and sites are reexamined. The comer of Washington and Main Streets becomes the location where a bus driver ejected Sarah Mae Fleming for violating the color barrier.

Columbia's City Hall is reframed as a site of interracial dialogue. All of Columbia SC 63's tours draw on historic sites and buildings to more fully understand the city's civil rights history. In addition to regular walking tours and those planned for special events, Columbia SC 63 has also taken part in bus tours, public programs, and frequent presentations to schools and community groups that showcase historic properties, even if they do not take place in them. Last year alone, fourteen thousand people benefited from Columbia SC 63's programs and presentations. This number does not include the many more who took a self-guided walking tour or read waysides signs or panels without even knowing they were part of a larger organization. The true number of people that Columbia SC 63 has impacted since its inception is likely much higher than the numbers suggest.

All of these public markers drew on place-based research carried out by Columbia SC 63, much of which highlighted the city'scivil rights history for the very first time. Early on in the project, Columbia SC 63 faced the obstacle of misunderstanding. Many people asserted that Columbia, and South Carolina, did not have a civil right's history to speak of. Still, visitors and city-residents alike will claim that they had no idea that anything related to the civil rights movement occurred in Columbia. This common idea stood asa barrier early on in the course of Columbia SC 63, but through its work, the organization has helped to alter this idea in the public mindset. While the focus of Columbia SC 63's work remains on the city itself, it has endeavored

to show how Columbia's history connects to a much broader national story. A number of major civil rights victories have their start in South Carolina - from the Briggs v. Elliott court case leading to Brown v. Board to Rosa Parks' lawyer Fred Gray using the case of Columbia resident Sarah Mae Flemming in his defense. Columbia SC 63 has educated a large number of people on how the city, and the state, has a large role in the civil rights movement, even though it is often overlooked.

Columbia SC 63 has also overcome the logistical issue of not owning or administering any of the historic properties it uses to tell Columbia's civil rights history. As a result, any tours or public programming relies on the use of either spaces open to the public (such as Main Street) or partnerships with the administrators of historic properties. Columbia SC 63 has made this an opportunity to partner with a wide range of organizations and individuals in order to more effectively access historic sites. Over the years, Columbia SC 63 has partnered with historic churches, historic preservation organizations, schools, and civic and community organizations of all sizes. As a result, it has created a network of support within the community that has allowed Columbia SC 63 to grow and share the civil rights history of Columbia widely.

Alongside its numerous partners, Columbia SC 63 has brought to Columbia nationally­ recognized figures involved in the civil rights movement and individuals still advocating for greater equality today. For example, a public program at Benedict College's historic Antisdel Chapel attracted a large audience to hear civil rights advocates Charles McDew, Connie Curry, and Cleveland Sellers, all leaders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Similarly, Sarah Collins Rudolph, who survived the blast when she was with the four young girls killed at the 16th Street Church Bombing in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963, spoke at the historic Sidney Park CME Church. Columbia SC 63 makes extensive use of historic properties as sites for learning about the civil rights movement, making clear their value not just to history, but today as well.

Columbia SC 63's efforts have taken shape with a commitment to the public through historic preservation. By increasing awareness of the diverse range of historic sites in Columbia, the organization has helped to highlight historic properties that might otherwise be overlooked or underappreciated, putting them at risk. Instead, by drawing attention to Columbia's civil right's history, Columbia SC 63 has helped to keep African American historic properties a vital part of Columbia's historical landscape. Importantly, Columbia SC 63's tours and public programs are affordable to the public, offering free programs wherever possible. This, combined with outreach to underserved groups within the city, helps make Columbia SC 63 truly a public history organization designed to serve the entire public.

The work of Columbia SC 63 continues. Efforts are currently underway to install a state historic marker recognizing the Supreme Court case Edwards v. South Carolina, which stemmed from a protest on the statehouse grounds in 1961. This marker will help to make clear to all visitors the many different types of history at the center of legislation for the state of South Carolina, including resistance to unjust laws. In other historic locations around the city, Columbia SC 63 is working to install additional wayside signs for visitors as well as planning programs to illuminate that history. Columbia SC 63 remains dedicated to bringing Columbia's civil rights history to the public with the use of historic properties around the city. Columbia SC 63's motto lays out exactly why: these stories matter.

 


Honor Award:
BOUDREAUX & Hotel Trundle

Sumter, LLC
for
BOUDREAUX & Hotel Trundle

Heather Mitchell, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
BOUDREAUX
for
BOUDREAUX & Hotel Trundle

Lee Mashburn
Mashburn Construction
for

BOUDREAUX & Hotel Trundle

Located one block from Main Street and part of the Columbia Commercial National Register Historic District is the new boutiqueHotel Trundle and offices of Columbia based architecture firm, BOUDREAUX. Historic architectural detail ing blended witheclectic interior finishes offers a distinctive destination for travelers and a creative, inspiring workplace. With 41unique rooms, a fitness center, dynamic lobbies, and an open design studio, each space features character defining elements such as pressed tin ceilings, restored hardwood floors and plaster walls, exposed brick and structure and restored storefronts. This rehabilitation project unites three historic buildings and takes advantage of multiple tax incentive opportunities including abandoned building credits, fa ade easement, and state and federal historic tax credits therefore being sensitive to the Secretary ofthe Interior's Standards inside and out. Attracting visito rs from all of the country and contributing the economic revitalization ofdowntown Columbia, this is a high impact project that has overcome difficul ty to serve as an example of outstanding commitmentto historic preservation and exemplary preservation techniques.

In order to meet the program needs for the hotel, the project combined three separate buildings into one:1519 Sumter Street (builtin1920), 1224 Taylor Street (built in1940) and 1222 Taylor Street (built in1914). The hotel occupies the first and second floors of 1224 and 1222 Taylor and the first floor of 1519 Sumter. The architectural firm occupies the second floor of 1519 Sumter. When the design process began, only 1519 Sumter was part of the Columbia Commercial Historic District. The building Owners made the decision to try and have the othe r two buildings added to the district in order to take advantage of National and StateHistoric Tax Incentives. To do so, metal paneling installed in the 1970s and concealing the facades was remove.d Fortunately, theoriginal building features were mostly intact underneath the metal, enabling the structures to be added to the District. Through the useof archival photos, the facades or all three buildings were restored, including restoration of original terra cotta, wood and metalstorefronts, prismglass, plaster, and metal panels. All of which are examples of the care and craftsmanship that comes withexemplary preservation techniques.

Combining three historic buildings into one was not without its challenges on the interior. Although the buildings were adjacent toeach other, floor heights differed and there was limited space to plan for common elements such as stairs, elevators, and mechanicaland electrical spaces. The design team developed a strategy to place a stair and elevator at the "knuckle" where all three buildingscame together and which all three can share. Utilities are primarily hidden on the roof and in the basement of 1519 Sumter. The designteam worked closely with the Contractor to ensure the routing of piping, fire suppression system, ductwork, and conduits wasefficient and not detrimental to historic integrity spaces.

Along with the challenges of combining the buildings, two new additions were needed in order to meet the minimum number of guest rooms required by the Hotel. An existing loading dock on the south side of the building was infilled to create two rooms, and a smalladdition was constructed on the second floor of 1222 Taylor Street to create five rooms. Once the second floor addition was added, anddue to the buildings location within the city block, several first floor rooms no longer had access to natural light. In order to allownatural light into the windowless rooms, light wells were created between rooms in the second floor addition. These light wells serveas key features of these interior spaces and are one of the most unique elements of any room within the hotel.

A key design strategy for all of the interior spaces was to create unique experiences and celebrate the character of the architecture.The lobby combines the front space of both1224 and 1222 Taylor, establishing a strong street presence and taking advantage of the soft northern light. Guest rooms within each building reflect the history of the building and the originalconstruction. Some rooms are finely finished with pressed tin ceilings, crown molding and finely detailed windows, while others aremore industrial with exposed brick walls and concrete ceiling structu re. In others, former elevator shafts are now sitting rooms or areading nook, original graffiti adorns a feature wall, and roll up door mechanisms age in place. Altogether, guests can be assured thateach stay at Hotel Trundle offers up a different experience. Tours by business groups and organizations from the Urban LandInstitute to Historic Columbia are frequent and illust rate the interest and community support for the project. The celebration of itshistoric character has led to numerous accolades and amplified its impact.

These include Yelp and Trip Advisor five star ratings, best hotel awards, recognition from Southern Living,a national real estateaward, and local economic impact awards from the Columbia Chamber.

Another example of the degree of difficulty occurs at the entry to 1519 Sumter. Inserting closed private hotel rooms and an entry stair up to the second floor office into what was historically a wide open retail space was antithetical to one of the character defining features of the building: looking through the store front deep into a high volume, pressed tin ceiling open retail space. In close partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service, we developed a strategy tomaintain the open retail character while meeting the functional needs. To visually open up the entry area we added glass partitionsbetween the hotel fitness center and installed glass stair rails. We also lowered the ceilings of the first two hotel rooms and extended thehistoric ceilings above them. Combined with the restored storefront. the result is an open and inviting space.

Once up the stairs, the professional office space is designed for teamwork and collaboration. Design features include: a high volumeopen studio with replicated pressed tin ceilings, huddle rooms for informal team meetings situated under rebuilt skylights, and atechnology-infused office living room and break space connected to an outdoor covered patio both created within awarehouse/storage addition to the original building. Brick-filled window openings were reopened on the south side while newwindow openings were cut on the north side without jeopardizing the historic integrity. BOUDREAUX's office has also achieved LEED Commercial Interiors certification, serving as a model for the shared values of preservation and environmental sustainability.

This success of this mixed use rehabilitation is a testament to how creative design can overcome challenges tocreate a model for others, to be a catalyst for economic revitalization, and a celebration of historic character. It isindeed an example of outstanding commitment to historic preservation.

 


Honor Award:
Neville Hall at Presbyterian College

Michael Crisp
Presbyterian College
for
Neville Hall at Presbyterian College

David Dixon
Craig Gaulden Davis
for
Neville Hall at Presbyterian College

David Wise
Harper General Contractors
for
Neville Hall at Presbyterian College

Neville Hall is the architectural icon of Presbyterian College, in Clinton, SC. The domed, Georgian Revival architecture has stood proudly since 1907. Following years of deferred maintenance and renovations that devalued its character, the building was given new life through extensive restoration, renovations and new construction in 2017. The architect was tasked with keeping a keen eye on the grandeur of  the building to restore its prominence, upgrading the building with  state-of-the-art technology, and enhancing the heart of the campus with contemporary academic and student life spaces.

Restoration Design-Commissioned to restore the grandeur of the original design, the architects launched an intensive study of the building's condition and historical significance, paying particular attention to the central rotunda that had been concealed by decades of renovations. Working closely with faculty, administration and board members to execute this vision, the rotunda's majestic volume now connects each floor to the octagonal main entrance and floods the interior with nat ural light. The dazzling geometry of the sculpted ceiling, arched windows, ornamental railings and custom chandelier provide a remarkable composition of architectural delight .

In preserving the exterior facade, brick was repointed and rotting ornamental fascia was replicated and replaced. The dome's failing metal roof was repaired and insulated. Inside, preservation efforts extend beyond the restoration of the old rotunda into every corner of the facility. Historical documents and photos from the College's archives were studied in order to reproduce original geometry, moldings, railings, and newel posts.

An old chalkboard containing handwriting from a 1940's philosophy lecture was uncovered behind an interior wall from a previous renovation. The chalkboard was preserved and encased behind a glass frame and remains a symbol of the building's important role in shaping the thinking of young men and women.

Within the original st ru ct ure, an advantageous change of elevation at the rear of the building was utilized to create a state-of-the-art auditorium and lecture hall on the first floor immediately adjacent to the rotunda. Above this auditorium, the second and third floors are home to classrooms and faculty offices, consistent with former uses.

In addition to restoring Neville Hall's grandeur, the architects were challenged to provide a sensitive addition to the rear facade of the historic structure, activating the green space that defines the heart of campus and providing additional academic space and a new student lounge. Named in honor of a prominent local family, the Cornelson Center features a stone and glass entrance portico that honors the character, geometry, and architectural detail of the original building while asserting a more contemporary design. The interior decor features updated finishes and furnishings with all new mechanical, electrical, lighting and technology systems to establish a crisp, clean, state-of-the-art aesthetic. As a tasteful link to Neville Hall, a portion of the original facade and rear entrance is prominently preserved in the stairwell adjacent  to the new student lobby.

Navigating between Neville Hall and the enormous. Its state-of-t he-art classrooms, Cornelson Center is a seamless experience, auditoriums, lounges and offices, enclosed its parallel narrative of integrating the old within a familiar exterior with a fresh new, ever applicable, as this historic addition remain the very heart of this institution embraces future generations and beautiful campus for the next century of use.

Community Impact

Neville Hall has served asthe main academic building on campus for over a century, instilling an enduring sense of pride an d nostalgia for all students and faculty who have passed through its doors.What began as a need for academ ic space for this growing private college, quickly became a landmark project for alumni, faculty and students. The building which hadthe deepest cultural impac t on students during their time on campus had been neglected and disrespected for decades. The depraved condition of the building forced administrators to consider the merits of demolishing the building and beginning anew. Everyone associated with the college knew that preserving this iconic building would be a catalyst for other significant architectural projects on campus, and that bringing the building back to life and sharing its history and presence wit h future generations would be a worthy investment. As the college represents a major part of the life of its small town, the impact on both the college and the community has been

 Sustainable Design Strategies

The  design team began with intentions of achieving LEED certification and early pursuits indicated the design could  achieve a LEED Silver rating; however, during the construction documents phase, the college was not in position to  institute  a  cam p us wide recycling program in order to achieve prerequisite  points  for  certificat ion. Thus, t he   pursuit   of LEED was  not executed. Inevitably, a restoration of this magnitude inevitably includes sustain able design strategies and these strategies were not abandoned after the decision to not apply for certification. The building was originally heated and cooled through fan coil units in the exterior wall, and the new four-pipe, forced air system provides tremendous energy efficiency. New restrooms include water efficient fixtures. A completely rebuilt roof provides valuable insulation for energy savings. LED lighting was used throughout the building to dramatically reduce electrical consumption. Regional materials and products with recycled content were utilized extensively throughout the interior.


Honor Award:
Jackson Street Cottages

Cameron Glaws
Mount Vernon Partners/Brown-Glaws Contractors
for
Jackson Street Cottages

The Jackson Street cottages were built in the early 1890's to accommodate low to middle income families during urban expansion north from Charleston's city center due to population growth. The cottages are of high significance due to their construction methods and materials and ties to the African American culture of the Low Country. Their construction tells an important socio-economic story which contributes to the African American story in antebellum Charleston. The cottages depicthow newly freed African-Americans started building structures and communities away from the white elite of Charleston. The Jackson Street cottages are the largest intact grouping of Charleston Freedman's Cottage left in the city.

Due to the advanced deterioration of the cottages at the start of construction, much historic and non historic materials were removed in order to restore structural integrity. All salvageable historic materials were saved and put back into place or repurposed elsewhere in the cottages. For example, most of the historic siding was removed, saved, and put back into place while non-historic plywood that covered portions of the cottages was replaced with siding that matches the historic material. There was similar treatment of the piazzas with as much of the historic material being preserved and he rest being replaced in kind.

On the exterior of the cottages, few alterations were made. All cottages were restored to how the cottages most likely appeared originally.A larger piazza was added to the rear of no. 197 Jackson Street with new, wider decking that compliments the historic decking but is also distinct. On the interiors of the cottages, few changes were made as well. In order to meet ADA compliance and commercial code a small number of walls were erected to enclose restrooms and such, however the original floor plans remain in tact otherwise.

Many elements and details were restored. Due to the dilapidated state of the cottages, it was difficult to discern the original appearance of these elements and details. Luckily, this form of vernacular architecture is known for it's utility and simplicity, so stylistic decisions were made based on similar architecture of the same time period. Wall, ceiling and floor finishes were restored from their badly deteriorated states which can be seen in the before photos. Other details such as hearths of fireplaces were restored with historic brick laid in a herringbone pattern which compliments the historic fireplaces but is also distinct. Kitchen and bathroom appliances were neither original nor salvageable so they were replaced with new appliances which compliment the spaces, but are distinctly new. Elements such as doors and windows were replaced with new materials as nearly all doors and windows were missing and instead had plywood in their place, which can be seen in the before photos as well.

When this project began, the cottages were uninhabitable, missing even their most vital elements such as doors, windows and large swaths of siding. The interiors of the cottages were in similar disrepair, missing necessary elements such as walls and ceiling and functioning kitchens and bathrooms. The aim of this project was to restore the integrity and function of these structures and to repurpose them into offices and event space where the public can enjoy these historic treasures. With the help ofhistoric tax credits which were awarded by the State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service, the Jackson Street Cottages are well­ preserved and will remain in their historic grouping for years to come.

The project and its accompanying National Register Nomination will survive forever as a record of the lives of 20th Century working families and African Americans in Charleston. The undertaking was of the utmost challenging due to the advanced deterioration of the structures, and was hailed by the Preservation Society of Charleston as the "new standard for historic preservation in Charleston" at their 2020 Carolopolis Awards.

 


Honor Award:
Claussen’s

Ryan Hyler
Styx, Co.
for
Claussen's

Julie Tuttle
Styx, Co.
for
Claussen's

David Tuttle
Styx, Co.
for
Claussen's

The Claussen's building has resided in the bustling Five Points Village since its construction in 1928. At 25,000 square feet, the industrial two-story building has undergone multiple transformations, from a bakery to a hotel, leading up to its current adaptation as a boutique apartment complex.

The building was commissioned in the early 20th century by George Frederick Claussen as the epicenter of what would become the regional industrial chain, Claussen's Bakery. Claussen, whose grandfather immigrated from Germany to  establish a steam bakery in Charleston, expanded to prominent cities in both South Carolina  and  Georg ia. The bakery contributed to the industrial economic growth of Columbia, employing hundreds of South Carolinians by the 1940s.

The bakery ceased operation in 1963, Claussen's was then repurposed as a locally owned inn from 1986 until 2015. During this period in the building's history, the interior space was segmented into small living quarters and its utilitarian past was completely concealed for the commercial style that was in vogue. However, the exterior has been proudly preserved as a manifestation of Columbia's industrial past and the building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places for Commerce, Industry, and Architecture in 1987. The brick elevation is quintessential of the commercial architecture in the era featuring sparse decorative adornment with few exceptions such as the inlaid tablet inscribed with "Claussen's Bakery" and ornate shields displaying the date of construction, 1928. The other elevations fall instep with the pragmatic approach of the Green Street fac;ade. The daylighting strategy in the east facade consists of seven large spanning windows along an alleyway to bring in an abundance of natural light. This design consideration signifies the innovations that were required of industrial architecture in this period to create a high-performance space with the technology available. The adjacency to the railroad on the opposite side, which informed the building's trapezoidal form,housed large loading doors that lead to the lower level which were integral to the regional and local delivery services.

The interior was constructed strictly for function. The second level boasted a large open floor plan with high ceilings to improve the functionality of the bakery's production space. The brick walls were minimally painted or had tiling applied in select spaces. The original function of the second-floor space being for baking required heavy machinery. This created the need for a significant metal framing system to be engineered on the lower level.

The architect, in collaboration with the owner, strived to  achieve a balance between preserving the institution's historic elements while providing modern amenities and design considerations for the future residents. Twenty-nine units-studio  andstudio loft apartments-along with a community lounge and coworking space were developed from the existing framework. Special consideration was taken for the original elements, including steel trusses, wood ceiling, large windows, and exposed bricks, that enhance the quality of the space. The second-floor units enjoy high ceiling s, some with loft spaces, and the downstairs units share a semi-private al fresco area where the alley once was. All the units feature sleek new kitchenettes and bathrooms that complement the existing features. The communal areas showcase the steel support system along the mezzanine and in more intimate settings such as lounge.

Even throughout Claussen's many forms, in part to its central location, it has garnered steady economic and public interest in the Five Points Village community. From its establishment in the twenties, it acted as an integral contributor to the Five Points Village by supplying local vendors with various baked goods. Additionally, it  contributed to Columbia's growing importance in the  food trade industry along with companies such as the Allen Bros. Milling Co. who operate the Adluh Flour Mills. As an inn, the building's central location in Five Points and adjacency to downtown Columbia attracted a steady flow of visitors to the area. Present day, Claussen's revival coincides wit h a much larger revitalization narrative in the Columbia area.  The Columbia Main Street exemplifies these efforts and has undergone a recent transformation from a desolate, even dangerous, area at times to a lively urban core filled with new businesses, local events, and residential development. The Vista, the Bull Street District, as well as Five Points have been experiencing similar revitalization efforts in the last decade and are contributing to  a new, vibrant atmosphere in the Midlands.

The combined local effort made it the prime time to rekindle the Claussen's building's role as a historic institution that continually gives value and service to its community. The location's proximity to some of Columbia's beloved establishment offers a unique living experience to a wide range of demographics. Adaptive reuse projects such as these have the capability to attract modern day users because of their distinct connection to the past. The repurposing that took place in the 1980s preserved the utilitarian historical style that is now brought to the forefront of the design. The design unmasks wide spanning steel beams and posts as well as the worn brick interior facade that is evocative of the building's past. Claussen's minimalist design and preservation approach grants the residents the connection to the past that they are seeking out while simultaneously providing a blank canvas to make their own mark on the building.

 


Honor Award:
Initial Q Restaurant/UnderPin Lanes ‘N Lounge

Donald L. Love, Jr., AIA
McMillian Pazdan Smith Architecture
for
Initial Q Restaurant/UnderPin Lanes’ N Lounge

Sean McEnroe
127 West Main, LLC
for
Initial Q Restaurant/UnderPin Lanes’ N Lounge

Sandra Cannon
Sandra Cannon Interior Design
for
Initial Q Restaurant/UnderPin Lanes’ N Lounge

Impact on the Community

Spartanburg's 127 West Main Street has been a vital part of the community since its opening in 1928 as The Leader department store. The store thrived until 1943 when a devastating fire destroyed much of the building. The entire structure was rebuilt that same year with an Art Deco design, and over the coming decades continued to serve as The Leader, Kimbrell's Furniture, and later a series of nightclubs, ultimately closing its doors in 2015.

After 127's final closure, McMillan Pazdan Smith and Sandra Cannon were asked to revitalize the building and, according to Project Architect Donnie Love, "carry the past into the future with its new, but historically respectful design. We chose to maintain the building's original Art Deco character and build upon it with a new entertainment venue." The Art Deco style reached the height of its popularity during the 1920's and embodied the luxury and glamour of the age. The new space serves multiple functions: Underpin Lanes 'N Lounge, a boutique bowling alley serving light fare and craft drinks; Initial Q a social bar and smokehouse; and a future private events space. This venture is unique in that the design team had the opportunity to preserve a historically significant part of downtown Spartanburg, while also investing in the community where they work and live.

Obstacles to Overcome

Because the building served as multiple nightclubs before its final closure, the previous tenants had to reevaluate the structural components of the floor system and install 2"x 611 walls in the basement to provide temporary support to the main floor. Since Initial Q and the events center are both located on the main floor, and the basement was to be used for Underpin, our design team was required to reinforce the original structural members to accommodate the  new use of the building and eliminate the non-original walls. This was accomplished by removing the ceilings in the basement and strengthening the original structural system across the entire area between the main level and lower levels while maintaining the original ceiling height.

Additionally, the site features access on both the north and south sides of the building from its days as a department store. The north side entrance is located on West Main Street and has access to both Initial Q and Underpin Lanes. The south side includes an entrance to the future private events space located on West Broad Street. The team faced the unique challenge of creating a cohesive space-one that that was easy for patrons to find and access, but also served three distinctly different functions. This was accomplished by creating a unique entrance on the north side that leads to Initial Q on the main level and Underpin Lanes on the basement level while serving as the accessible entrance for the events center. This new entrance, created to reflect the original design of the Leader's main entrance, reclaims the original splendor ofthe full department style windows. Sandra Cannon, Interior Designer, was able to replicate what would have been considered "clean" tile patterns that were original to the design and used a lighting layout, angled at 40 degrees, to give a nod to the Art Deco style. Chrome was used in the color and finish to accomplish a similar aesthetic.

 Example of Outstanding Commitment to Historic Preservation and Practices

Maintaining the Classic Art Deco Style on both the Exterior and Interior. On the north side of the building, S0s-era metal panels were installed over the original facade. While they were not considered modern, they were still newer than the original facade from the 40s. The panels were removed, exposing some lost windows. The original concrete facade was completely restored. Details destroyed when the panels were installed were replicated using historic photographs. The stucco south elevation was mostly intact but featured some windows that had been infilled. Those windows were re-opened, recreating the original look of the building, with all the historic steel windows restored and reinstalled along the North and the South elevations.

Sandra Cannon carefully researched the influence of an Art Deco-style department store, specifically one in Spartanburg, gearing materials and design layout to that concept. The original ceilings, lost during a previous renovation, were not reinstalled leaving the original lattice truss system exposed, one of 127's most unique features. Research also uncovered a building like this often hadskylights to bring light to the core. A skylight was added to the design to not only bring in natural light, but also give the interior space an authentic feeling of a Pre-War department store.

The bar featured in Initial Q was designed with a tubular front facade to follow suit with patterns used in the Art Deco period, and Sandra designed "ghost paintings" to give the space scale and vibrancy. The silhouettes chosen were all inspired by Art Deco work and can be found along the side wall as well as the shared kitchen wall of Initial Q. Color palettes were chosen to be reminiscent of Art Deco, choosing unique, dominant colors to help bring all three spaces together.

Interior Fixtures and Finishes. The original department store featured a pneumatic tube system behind the walls to move receipts and cash payments between floors. Sandra ' s design team identified wall exposure, found the original pneumatic tubes, and harvested them from the wall to reuse as a light fixture. Her team also installed a floating trellis over the bar of Initial Q to act as a backbar shelving system to mimic a 40s-era department store. Sandra's research uncovered that the basement originally housed both the fabric and children's departments. To maintain the spirit of creativity and playfulness, she purchased and upcycled elements for the interior decoration from an original department store.

Preserving Historic Tiles and Cultured Stone. The team preserved the original ceramic tile found in the basement, once serving as the seating area for the soda area. This refinished element inspired and connected to every bit of the design. The original building featured terrazzo and wood flooring throughout. Both were well-maint ained, and able to be revitalized and reused. The design around the bar of Initial Q was meant to be reminiscent of the original department store and the design team used cultured stone to mimic the real Carrera marble used at the time.

As a community-focused firm with a passion for preserving historic spaces, this project represented a unique opportunity for our team to come together to refresh the presence of an old friend along Main Street.